Friday, February 4, 2011

Following, dodging and changing

I used to be a system follower...

...but then I realized that traditional schooling was doing a lot more harm than good for a lot of kids.

I used to be a system dodger...

...but then I realized that flying under the radar came with two consequences: firstly, it meant that my colleagues and administration didn't notice that I was bending the rules. Secondly, it meant that my colleagues and administration didn't know why I was bending the rules; thus, leaving them ignorant to how things could and should be improved.

I am now a system changer...

... I still dodge, but I actively choose not to do it in seclusion. 

I won't hide anymore. 

I'm confident in my research and experiences, and I want to be a protagonist for improvement. I want to be a catalyst for both discussion and action.

How will I know if I'm making a difference?

If I can influence even one more educator to stop following the system and start dodging the system... 

...if I can influence even one more educator to stop dodging the system and start changing the system... 

...if I can influence even one more educator to stop hiding and openly and actively engage in being a protagonist for improvement...

... then I will know I made a difference.

9 comments:

  1. How does this affect your relationship with your employer?

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  2. Thanks for the influence, Joe. I've been pushing my admin to allow me to change how I assess in the classroom for the past year. Your ideas inform me, but more often your posts inspire/challenge me to do better. With persistence, I've finally been given permission to work in the open - no more dodging here.

    You can know that you've made a difference - here's one educator who has stopped hiding and is now "openly and actively engag(ing) in being a protagonist for improvement."

    Thanks.

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  3. One down - you've helped and inspired ME.

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  4. I am sure you already influence more people than you realise. Your posts always make me think and reflect on my own practice. Thanks.

    (I am about to share this within our own NSW DET social media network that uses Yammer - I would link you but it is email domain restricted) I am sure those who read it will apprecaite your words, experience and inspiration.

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  5. Following and dodging is fine ... as long as you're following or dodging the right things. Thanks for being a powerful voice for necessary change, Joe.

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  6. Following and dodging are fine, as long as you're following or dodging the right things. Thanks for being a powerful voice for necessary change, Joe.

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  7. I had always wanted to do things like scrap traditional grading and assessments. But, I didn't have the practical know how to make it work best to the benefits of the kids.

    Thank you for sharing your journey so that others, like myself, may learn the practicalities of such a system.

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  8. In the words of my son, "Me likey." Thanks for helping me clarify in my head the difference between followers, dodgers, and changers.

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  9. This post is proving more and more useful for me as well. It's been a tough year for me both personally and professionally, but having a model like this one that suggests a way forward is really helpful. My reflections here: http://j1t.blogspot.com/2011/05/my-final-part-3-dodging-and-changing.html

    Thanks for this post, and for many others which I'll also be putting to good use!

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